Project Showcase: “The World Wars”

world-wars-headerThe TV network HISTORY announces a three-day series premiering this Monday (Memorial Day in the US) which treats the two world wars as a linked event—what Winston Churchill called “the second Thirty Years’ War.” Narrated by actor Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker), World Wars tells the story of three decades of conflict through the eyes of political and military leaders like Churchill, Hitler, Roosevelt, Tojo, and Mussolini. It will air on May 26, 27, and 29 at 9 pm Eastern Time. Later in the summer it will also appear in more than 160 countries and on H2, the cable channel formerly called History International, which now airs much of the documentary content once shown on the History Channel before its rebranding as HISTORY.

Dirk Hoostra, Executive Vice President and General Manager for HISTORY and H2, notes that the series keys off the start of the centennial of World War I and presents an opportunity “to tell one of the greatest stories of all time in a different way.” The episodes will draw on original footage, computer-generated imagery (CGI), and commentary from Senator John McCain, General Colin Powell, and others.

The series also incorporates a robust social media experience, with live-tweeting from @HISTORY during the episodes and a “War of Wits” trivia competition in partnership with QuizUp. The series hashtag is #WorldWars.

Projects in the print-digital pipeline

sketch of well

Sketch for a key element of the “Slavery in New York” exhibit, found in the Public History Commons collection relating to the exhibit.

Regular visitors to the Public History Commons may have noticed that we’ve undergone a slight facelift recently.  The History@Work blog, initially the sole occupant of this site, has gradually been joined by other projects:  the News Feed, The Public Historian’s digital space, and now our new Library. To try to keep our interface clear and easy to navigate, we’ve bumped the blog down a little bit on the page and simplified the navigation bar.  We hope readers are finding their way around without too much trouble.

We’re also excited to introduce the Library to you.  Although still in its very early stages, it represents an important step in a larger project of creating flexible platforms for publication and communication and ways for our print and digital projects to cross-pollinate more easily.  We’re starting to get a sense of the possibilities through two recent collaborations, one of which revolves around Richard Rabinowitz’s award-winning article “Eavesdropping at the Well: Interpretive Media in the ‘Slavery in New York’ Exhibition.” Continue reading

“Seeds of Change”: A pop-up museum for Monterey

plantsHeading to Monterey for the National Council on Public History’s annual meeting next week?  Don’t forget to pack your contribution to NCPH’s first pop-up exhibit, “Seeds of Change:  Public History and Sustainability”!

Generated entirely from participant contributions and built onsite at NCPH, “Seeds of Change:  Public History and Sustainability” will examine how issues of sustainability converge with the work we are doing in public history.  We hope that the exhibit will facilitate conversation and serve as a forum for discussion about the conference theme.  We invite conference attendees to share their experiences with sustainable practices and to brainstorm creative ways that historians can help general audiences comprehend, historicize, and complicate discussions about sustainability. Continue reading

All the news that fits: The view from where I sit

mosaic of typesetter

Typesetter, John A. Prior Health Services Library mosaic mural, Columbus, Ohio. Photo credit: Ehschnell at en.wikipedia.

For quite a number of years now, I’ve been one of the people involved in gathering and disseminating news about the public history field through the various channels of the National Council on Public History:  the H-Public listserv, the News Feed here in the Public History Commons, and the regular emailed updates that go out to NCPH members.  More or less once a week, I cull through other listservs, submitted announcements, and odds and ends that come to us through various professional and social networks and try to reduce the pile to a more or less digestible-sized list of professional opportunities for public historians.  Sometimes this feels like a purely clerical task (there’s a lot of cutting and pasting involved!) but every once in a while I realize what a valuable and broad perspective it’s given me on our ever-evolving field.  In return for those hours of cutting and pasting, I get an ongoing education about what people are doing “out there” and how a very wide range of practitioners are putting history to work in the world.  Here’s how things look to me at the moment. Continue reading