Social & Environmental Issues

woman holding up signPublic history is an extremely multi-faceted field, and issues of social and environmental justice and activism are by no means central to much of what goes on in it. And yet these concerns motivate many public historians to some extent, and sometimes to a great extent. As the field matures, as the planet warms, as we continue to debate questions of “shared authority,” inclusion and exclusion, political and representational power, and ways of thinking about stewardship, the time seems right to foreground some of these topics here in the NCPH blog.

Click here to access the March 2014 digital publication “Public History in a Changing Climate,” part of a print/digital series that also includes a special issue of The Public Historian focusing on environmental sustainability.  For a bibliography of sources on public history and sustainability issues, click here.

Image:  Mary Dungan of Marianna, Florida draws attention to dropping lake levels as part of the 2012 350.org “Connect the Dots” day of action.

 

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