History @ Work

History@Work is a multi-authored, multi-interest blog for all those with an interest in the practice and study of history in public. Learn More→

“Mickey Mouse History”: A pop-up exhibit exploring fair use and public history

Popup TitlePublic historians rely on images, audio, and film to engage the public and interpret the past. But almost every professional has experienced confusion over copyright restrictions or faced expensive licensing agreements. Some of us may get by with using images from the public domain, but many historical images remain under copyright. What happens when you want to interpret Mickey Mouse, a comic strip, a National Geographic cover, or some other copyrighted work as a historical artifact?

There is a “culture of fear and doubt” that prevents public historians from making fair use of copyrighted works in their exhibitions, films, or other works. This pop-up exhibit at the National Council on Public History’s annual meeting in Nashville seeks to address that problem. The exhibit has two goals: to raise awareness about the right to fair use and to collect stories from public historians navigating the use of images and copyright law in their work. Continue reading

Graduate student project award: The Lost Museum

Editor’s Note: This series showcases the winners of the National Council on Public History’s awards for the best new work in the field. Today’s post is by the students of the Jenks Society for Lost Museums, creator of a unique exhibition in the Brown Public Humanities Program.

J.W.P. Jenks with his taxidermy students, 1875.  Photo credit: John Hay Library and Brown University Archives.

J.W.P. Jenks with his taxidermy students, 1875. Photo credit: John Hay Library and Brown University Archives

It circulated as a bit of campus lore: the curious tale of the Jenks Museum of Natural History, which once existed at Brown University.

As graduate students in Brown’s Public Humanities program, we were intrigued when we first heard about the long-gone Jenks Museum. We spend much of our time thinking about preservation and memory, so the idea of a lost museum at our university resonated with us. We began to imagine recreating the museum as a class project on the occasion of Brown’s 250th anniversary. In the fall of 2013, a group of ten students with a range of backgrounds in the arts and humanities joined forces to carry out this work. We called ourselves the Jenks Society for Lost Museums. Continue reading

Treading on hallowed ground: Football Hallelujah! at the Amsterdam Museum

This post is the second in a series on the Amsterdam Museum. To read the first post, click here.

The exhibit’s leading image, Argentina’s legendary Diego Maradona in his classic praying pose, introduced a striking thematic juxtaposition. Photo Credit: Caro Bonink/Amsterdam Museum

The exhibit’s leading image, Argentina’s legendary Diego Maradona in his classic praying pose, introduced a striking thematic juxtaposition. Photo Credit: Caro Bonink/Amsterdam Museum

“The stadiums are getting fuller and the churches emptier.”

This observation, from Amsterdam Museum director Paul Spies, served as the inspiration for the museum’s intriguing, controversial, and, at times, humorous temporary exhibit Football Hallelujah! On view September 2014 through January 2015, the exhibit explored the ways in which international football (soccer) fandom parallels a religious experience. While attending the first annual conference of the International Federation of Public History I visited the exhibit, intrigued to see the approach taken by a curatorial staff that dared to tread on sports fans’ hallowed ground. Continue reading

You can do better

Wikipedia 101 workshop at the 2014 NCPH Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA. Photo credit: Courtesy of NCPH.

Wikipedia 101 workshop at the 2014 NCPH Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA. Photo credit: NCPH

In 2011, the Professional Development Committee developed a set of guidelines for annual meeting workshops. We see workshops as providing hands-on and participatory experiences which impart practical information, rather than the typical conference presentation or “show and tell” case studies. With these guidelines in place, the committee has begun to think about a broader curriculum of professional development opportunities to serve the needs of National Council on Public History members. To do so, we are seeking your input though a brief survey. Continue reading

How should NCPH commemorate the past and help shape the future of federal preservation policy? (Part III)

Editors’ Note: In 2016, the National Park Service will mark the 100th anniversary of its founding, and the National Historic Preservation Act will have been in effect for 50 years. These two landmark moments come just two years after the National Museum of American History quietly marked its own 50th anniversary in 2014. A Working Group at the National Council on Public History 2015 Annual Meeting in Nashville will serve as a collaborative forum for planning a scholarly symposium to mark these important events. The symposium will take place in March 2016 during the NCPH Annual Meeting in Baltimore. This post is directed to participants in the working group, but all blog readers are invited to comment.

Woolworth's lunch counter program at the National Museum of American History. Photo credit: Image courtesy of Michelle

Greensboro lunch counter program at the National Museum of American History. Photo credit: Image courtesy of Michelle Delaney

Thanks to your comments, our working group team has much to consider and prepare for the session. We look forward to meeting in person to move ahead with plans for the 2016 symposium, intended to address how NCPH should commemorate the past and consider the future of federal cultural preservation policy.

This blog post is our third and final post to guide our work in Nashville. Comments are due by April 6. (Part I & Part II can be found here.)

Certain key themes have resonated throughout the blogs and comments, which we can expand in Nashville. Continue reading

Proposing a Business and History program

 

Tag cloud from Centre for Regulation and Market Analysis conference in Adelaide, South Australia. Image credit: University of South Australia

Some nineteen categories of public history programs are now offered. Many offer skills and knowledge useful for specialized businesses (archival practices, business histories, publishing). None prepare history students for general business careers. Business and History is designed to fill this void by linking historians’ methods to solving problems common to private enterprise. Continue reading

Reflections on writing “Other Than War”

Editors’ Note: This series showcases the winners of the National Council on Public History’s awards for the best new work in the field. Today’s post is by retired Department of Defense Historian, Frank Schubert, winner of the Michael C. Robinson Prize for Historical Analysis for his book Other Than War: The American Military Experience and Operations in the Post Cold War Decades. Schubert reflects on his experiences serving as a public historian at the Pentagon with a unique audience: directors and staff of the Department of Defense. He also considers the ways that the 9/11 attacks and their aftermath influenced the writing and publication of a book focused primarily on cooperative stability and peacekeeping operations, topics that became more relevant after the withdrawal of combat troops from Afghanistan beginning in 2014.

Other Than WarLooking back on nearly a decade as a historian inside the Pentagon, I can say that there are three things of which I am particularly proud. The first involved the design in 1996 of an exhibit on the career of General Omar Bradley for the Chairman’s Corridor. The second came when Department of the Army bureaucrats saw the aftermath of 9/11 as an opportunity to expand their office space by removing the library to a location in Crystal City. I managed to convince the director of the Joint History Office, for whom I worked, that he had to mobilize support to resist such a move. He did, and the library stayed. And the third was writing this little book, Other Than War: The American Military Experience and Operations in the Post-Cold War Decade. Continue reading

Project Showcase: Lakota Emergence

PrintThe Center for American Indian Research and Native Studies (CAIRNS) in South Dakota will present an innovative exhibit in early May 2015 called “Lakota Emergence.” The exhibit focuses entirely on the short Lakota emergence narrative titled “How the Lakota Came Upon the World,” published in 1917. The exhibit divides the 1,251-word narrative into 16 “passages,” and pairs each passage with an outstanding example of a practical or artistic object from the Sioux Indian Museum (one of the three Indian Arts and Crafts Board museums in the United States). The selected objects span a period of time from before the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty all the way to the early 1970s. All were created by Lakotas and were collected from within the boundaries of the 1868 Treaty, including what is now Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and Standing Rock Reservations, as well as the community of Rapid City.

In addition to the passages and museum objects, original artworks by distinguished and emerging contemporary Lakota artists will be featured, thereby creating what are called “vignettes.” These 16 vignettes will recount the Lakota emergence narrative in written words, museum collections, and contemporary artworks. Dr. Craig Howe, director of CAIRNS and curator of Lakota Emergence, says “the exhibit was conceived to illustrate that the emergence narrative continues to be a source of creativity, and that Wind Cave was and always will remain a landscape of special significance in Lakota cosmology.”