International Perspectives

globe-constructionAs public history continues to intersect with new trends in museum display, memorialization, place-making, tourism, human rights activism, and economic development around the globe, the conversation about what it means to be a public historian is broadening in ways that are enlivening and often–given the geographical, cultural, and linguistic differences involved–challenging. This section of History@Work is designed to contribute to that conversation by highlighting projects in places where public history is emerging as a discourse and by facilitating professional exchange about transnational projects and comparative approaches.

Editors: Emily Gann, Jean-Pierre Morin

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International collaboration and comparative research

Undertaking international projects presents challenges beyond the normal routine of archival and secondary research, oral interviews, writing, and revising. There are new issues, such as what language will the work ultimately be published in? What time frame will accommodate the … Continue reading

Treading on hallowed ground: Football Hallelujah! at the Amsterdam Museum

This post is the second in a series on the Amsterdam Museum. To read the first post, click here. “The stadiums are getting fuller and the churches emptier.” This observation, from Amsterdam Museum director Paul Spies, served as the inspiration … Continue reading

International approaches to LGBTQ public history

2014 saw huge steps forward in representations of LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning) lives in public history on both sides of the Atlantic. Projects have been launched in both the United States and the United Kingdom that … Continue reading

Amsterdam Museum, a people’s history

(Editor’s note: This post is the first of a two-part series looking at the Amsterdam Museum.) As a certified History Nerd and lover of cities, one of the first things I do when I arrive in a new city is check … Continue reading

Canadians and the NCPH

The field of public history has a long history of its own in Canada.  The first programme was founded at the University of Waterloo in Ontario in 1983 (though it has since been disbanded), and the University of Western Ontario … Continue reading

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