In the Academy

Source:  Ladies Home Journal, 1931 (George Eastman House Collection)

Source: Ladies Home Journal, 1931 (George Eastman House Collection)

Public history educators often work in isolation. We are often the lone public practitioner among traditional historians, an adjunct surrounded by tenure track faculty, or a collaborative scholar among independent researchers. This blog provides a new kind of collegial space. Posts and comments will address pressing issues in the field of public history education, identify innovative approaches to teaching and learning, foster collaboration, and suggest best practices. Despite diversity in where and how we work, public history educators share an interest in curriculum development, pedagogy, ethics, and scholarship. Here, we will encourage one another, test new ideas, and receive thoughtful feedback.

Editors:  Amy M. Tyson (DePaul University), Andrea Burns (Appalachian State University)

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