History @ Work

History@Work is a multi-authored, multi-interest blog for all those with an interest in the practice and study of history in public. Learn More→

Project Showcase: Explore le Tour

Main-Logo-855x300Longer than the Olympics and arguably as prestigious, the most attended sporting event on earth is the Tour de France, which meanders through more than 2,000 miles of Europe’s most picturesque and challenging terrain. One cannot divorce the race from the surrounding cultural heritage and history. Yet this aspect of the Tour has not been fully integrated into the media surrounding the event.

This gap is what prompted me to create Explore le Tour as a side project to my full-time job in early 2015. The eventual concept is for Explore le Tour to become a comprehensive cultural and historical guide to the Tour de France route, where blog posts about specific topics are keyed to stage-by-stage maps and information. All this is geared towards enriching the television audience and traveler’s experience.

For those planning a trip to see the Tour in person, it offers ideas and context for things to see and do, many of which are off the beaten path. For the larger audience at home, the initiative serves as an armchair guide while watching the race on television. For Tour organizers, Explore le Tour offers an opportunity for increased fan engagement and possibly an expanded fan base thanks to the wide appeal of French culture across the globe. At the same time, the website moves to boost French tourism by marketing locations and events to the same global audience.

Join the peloton’s journey through France and history this July with Explore le Tour. Vive le Tour!

~ Alex Bethke is the Cultural Resources Program Lead for Navy Region Southwest in San Diego. He traveled to see the Tour de France in 2012 and launched Explore le Tour as a reflection of his three biggest passions, history, cycling, and travel.

Project Showcase: The Great Society Congress

Screenshot by Danielle Emerling

Image credit: Screenshot by Danielle Emerling

On October 15, 1966, President Lyndon Baines Johnson remarked: “When the historians of tomorrow write of today, they will say of the 89th Congress … ‘This was the great Congress.’” The president was elated that between January 1965 and December 1966, the 89th US Congress had enacted the most extensive legislative program since the New Deal. The Voting Rights Act, Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and amendments to the Social Security Act, which resulted in the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, were but a few of the transformative pieces of legislation passed as cornerstones of Johnson’s Great Society agenda. Continue reading

International collaboration and comparative research

Image credit: Courtesy of William F. Willingham. Undertaking international projects presents challenges beyond the normal routine of archival and secondary research, oral interviews, writing, and revising. There are new issues, such as what language will the work ultimately be published in? What time frame will accommodate the needed international travel? What added expenses will be encountered that are not part of the consideration for work confined to historical research within one country? Who will be chiefly responsible for coordinating the work occurring on different continents and seeing all the elements of the work through to the end? Even such minor questions as map scales, monetary systems, and how measurements and distances will be presented–English or metric–have to be resolved for consistency’s sake. Continue reading

Considering oral history as scholarship: Comments welcome

By Selena Wilke.  Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

By Selena Wilke. Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

In 2007, a professor at a Texas university began a thread on H-Oralhist, the oral history listserv.  “I am up for tenure next fall,” she wrote, “and am struggling to prove to my dean that the gathering, transcribing, editing and archiving of oral history is ‘scholarship.’ I am regularly applauded for the fact that I have begun an oral history program, trained forty undergraduate and graduate students in oral history methodology, gathered and processed over eighty-five interviews (in the past three years), and reconnected dozens of former students with our university (I began a ‘former student’ oral history project). Despite all of this, the dean of my college does not seem to recognize this as valuable, original scholarship. She is very supportive and enthusiastic about the oral history program, it just seems I need to help her redefine it.”

Continue reading

Public history and policy: A synergy

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. in 1951. Photo credit: Wikicommons.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. in 1951. Photo credit: Wikicommons

As policy makers and politicians debate and make important policy decisions, they are constantly dealing with the past. They must consider what has been tried and failed, and what options were overlooked and why. These are questions that require an understanding of history. Without the benefit of a historian’s expertise, it’s hard to know what may be misremembered and whether we are repeating the mistakes of the past. Institutional memory can be unreliable or even absent. By analyzing policy history, professionally trained historians provide essential context that explains why certain things were done and enables policy makers to make better decisions in the present. Continue reading

2016 NCPH/SHFG joint conference topic proposals

NCPH Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, 2015. Photo credit: NCPH.

NCPH Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, 2015. Photo credit: NCPH.

Last year, the National Council on Public History decided to pilot an optional topic proposal deadline for annual meeting session, workshop, and working group submissions (see last year’s announcement here), and it was a success. Of the 55 topic submissions received last year, 42 were resubmitted as full proposals, and 20 of those were accepted onto the program. This is incredible given the stiff competition last year (only 69 of 157 proposals were accepted). For the 2014 annual meeting, NCPH saw a 40% increase in proposals over any other year; and for 2015, we saw an increase of 26% over that! Based on the attendance increase in Nashville, and because the 2016 meeting is a joint conference with the Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG), there will be an increase in the total number of sessions and working groups accepted onto the Program, but competition will still be considerable. Continue reading

Best practices for establishing and developing a public history program

The Library at the University of South Carolina, on a campus that has had a long-time and active public history program. Photo credit: USC

The Curriculum and Training Committee of the National Council on Public History has prepared a draft best practices document, “Best Practices for Establishing and Developing a Public History Program.” This document is intended to supplement the existing best practices documents on MA programs in public history, public history for undergraduate students, and certificate programs in public history. By focusing on resources and support, it seeks to ensure high-quality training at the graduate level. Designed mainly for college and university faculty and administrators, the draft provides guidance on subjects, such as funding, hiring practices, tenure and promotion, curriculum development, and areas of specialization. We invite comments on this document. Please send comments and suggested revisions to daniel.vivian@louisville.edu by July 31. We look forward to hearing your thoughts.  Here is a link to the document.

~ Daniel Vivian is assistant professor of history and director of public history at the University of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. He is chair of the Curriculum and Training Committee for the 2015-2016 academic year.